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View Full Version : Achieving your new years resolution to lose weight this year



dknompton
01-16-2014, 06:07 PM
Every new years, thousands upon thousands of individuals make the new years resolution to lose weight/become more healthy. According to statisticbrain.com , 45% of Americans make new years resolutions while only 8% percent of those that do, achieve those resolutions. That's equates to 3% percent of Americans having the fortitude to achieve their new years resolutions ( and some of their resolutions may have been quite easy to achieve) sb.com said that this years top resolution was to lose weight. There are tons of 30,60, 90 day, 12 week ,6 week, whatever trainers out there that I won't lie, get you results. The problem is often the results are not sustainable. I believe it is because they often call for a complete change in habits. You are dropping one habit of eating unhealthy, you are adding a habit of eating healthy, and another of going to the gym every 4-5 days a week. That's a lot of stress and can lead a lot of folks to drop out or quit, or even if they do make it thru, begin to cheat as they think they earned it and slowly turn back to their old ways.

My solution is to break your weight lose goal in to sections. Some people may not be able to give up soda and unhealthy foods right away without extreme amounts of stress, but may be able to commit an hour to the gym 4-5 times a week. As long as you don't start eating more, the working out will start showing you results despite your poor diet. Will they be great, no, but they will be there and can motivate you to start cleaning up your diet. Also, as you begin working out, you will notice you need to eat healthier foods to fuel your body.

Maybe you don't like working out, but can see your self slowly adjusting your diet. Calculating your resting metabolism rate ( there are many calculators available on the net and on smartphones) and creating a deficit in your calories, even with eating the same unhealthy foods can lead to some weight loss. As you go on, try to replace more and more of your usually unhealthy meals of the day with healthy options.

Only after you've gotten some habit formed of moderately healthy eating or regular exercise, should you try to form the other habit. Hopefully seeing the results as you go along will encourage you to increase the pace of your habit forming.

The biggest problem with new years resolutions is you shouldn't be setting a goal to look good by the summer, or even by the end of the year( this really applies to any resolution) Your goal should be to safely arrive to a healthy, fit form that is easily sustainable due to the habits that have made your actions second nature. Wish you all the best of luck in achieving your goals this year!

rockyf1991
02-16-2015, 08:59 PM
I found for me, the kicker was falling in love with good, healthy food and realising that I actually enjoy exercise- rather than it becoming a chore. I look forward to going to the gym now- and focus on getting stronger and healthier- not solely on losing fat or being lighter on the scales :)

Totally agree that you need to take it in stages though- i think too many people want results fast, but with little to no effort, and by completely changing your lifestyle all at once there's just to much to cope with at once!