Follow Us On
Register
Keto Burn - The Natural Fat Burner
Forged Burner - The Extreme Fat Burner

Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1

    Push-pull training? 6 days a week?

    I'm very new to training but is there anything wrong with going straight into an advanced training program like training your body parts 3x a week. working out 6x a day?
    If i'm going to start from a very small weight and slowly progress with it. should be fine right?
    Anyone recommend a program that does this style training method? I keep seeing people talk about it but I don't know exactly what written programs say it.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by barmitsfa View Post
    I'm very new to training but is there anything wrong with going straight into an advanced training program like training your body parts 3x a week. working out 6x a day?
    If i'm going to start from a very small weight and slowly progress with it. should be fine right?
    Anyone recommend a program that does this style training method? I keep seeing people talk about it but I don't know exactly what written programs say it.
    I am more or less a noobie myself... I started weight training last year and did some serious damage to my back about 4 months in by following an aggressive program where the guys selling this method had a very one size fits all confidence that their program was the best and would work for anyone. I routinely had my form checked and so on, and I can't even now tell you what went wrong. I just woke up one morning paralyzed and screaming. Needless to say, I am now extremely skeptical of once size fits all pitches.

    The road to recovery was long, but I am just now returning to the gym myself. I did have a lot of time to read and watch videos and so on as I was lying around on my backside.

    Recognizing that my free advice is worth exactly what you paid for it ...

    You have to figure out your own stress/recovery cycle, and it is going to change on you as 1) your body gets used to training and 2) the weights you are lifting increase. In the first case, you will probably find your recovery time gets faster the more your body gets used to weight lifting. However, as the weights start getting really heavy, depending in your goals, you may find yourself needing more recovery before you hit the same muscle group again.

    There's a dude named Brad Schoenfeld who has written quite a bit about the science behind building muscle. His work seems to be fairly well respected by the nerdy science type guys I tend to enjoy on the YouTubes. He had some basic guidelines on how much training is too much, though he'd be the first to tell you that the answer is highly dependent on your own training history, injury history, nutrition and sleep protocols, the intensity of your workouts, your genetics, age, sex, weight, what if any performance enhancing drugs you take, and so on... The following guidelines were averages: his research suggested that anything up to 10 working sets in a single muscle group in one day was beneficial; after that you get into junk volume that isn't helping or, even worse, overtraining that creates a negative effect. He also suggests that more than 30 working sets in a single workout can lead to junk volume or overtraining. But that getting in 20 sets per muscle group in a week is beneficial (you could achieve this by hitting a muscle group 2 times a week, 10 sets each, for example). However, the 20 sets were not meant to be a hard ceiling. That was just the limit tested in this particular analysis. So this would not rule out (without further research) hitting each muscle group 3 times for a total of 30 sets, but you may have a hard time fitting all that in with only 30 sets per workout. He also stresses the need to consider secondary muscles, not just the main muscles, to prevent localized overtraining. Like many pull exercises for the back are also working the biceps and/or the brachialis, so if you don't consider that volume as being towards both the back and the biceps you risk not allowing your biceps proper recovery.

    So I think the big issues to jumping into 6 days a week involve carefully selecting your exercises so that you are not overtraining any one group and have time to recover before hitting a group again. An awful lot of beginner and intermediate programs stick with 3 or 4 days a week, but your own results will be specific to your situation. If you feel you can do more, try it out and see if it works. If not, adjust.

    When I first started, I needed 4 days of recovery on a given muscle group before I could hit that group again But after only 2 weeks, my recovery cycle dropped to 48 hours. As I continued to train, I stopped experiencing significant muscle soreness, so I no longer had a barometer for exactly how long I needed to wait before hitting a muscle group again. I just had to go on 'am I continuing to improve each week? (Either in weight/intensity or volume)' If 'yes', then my recovery time was sufficient. If 'no', then I needed to look at the possible culprits... Am I getting enough recovery time, am I eating enough, how is my sleep, am I overtraining any particular muscle group? Etc.

    The trick is to find out what works for you.

    Sent from my LM-V405 using Tapatalk

  3. #3
    Yeah, for me. Monday, Wednesday, Friday. Anymore and I don't really recover. Just me though. Not training for competition, just maintaining.
    www.mrsupps.com - Cutting Edge Supplements, Wholesale Prices

  4. #4
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Location
    New york
    Posts
    2
    I train 4 times a week. Monday, Wednesday, Friday - power. Thursday - cardio

 

 

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •